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580f867f86371 Front: Ava Ascheman, Erin Hunzeker, Mary Sterup, Kris Farris. Back: Jayna Lambelet, Cassidy Parks, Sydnie Othmer, Michael Jamison, Michiel Jansen, Mark Splichal
Front: Ava Ascheman, Erin Hunzeker, Mary Sterup, Kris Farris. Back: Jayna Lambelet, Cassidy Parks, Sydnie Othmer, Michael Jamison, Michiel Jansen, Mark Splichal

"Take Ten" - Journalism

October 25, 2016

Journalism Class
By Kris Farris

This past summer, my youngest daughter hosted her ten-year class reunion at our home. She spent days prior to the reunion creating class trivia questions, gathering old photos, and digging through boxes of items I had packed away when she had officially “left the nest.”  Watching close school friends connect again after ten years was fun; with each classmate arrival, the volume of chatter would rise and the conversations typically started with, “So what are you doing now?” After that, awkward silences began to occur…until the old high school yearbooks came out.

The moment the books were distributed, memories from some of the best years of their lives came to life. Stories and laughter emerged as the class recalled moments from high school that they had forgotten. It was then I realized the importance of being the instructor of our journalism class. The value of the JCC high school yearbook is not to be overlooked. A yearbook is treasured by many when it is first received, and it is a source to the past for nostalgic graduates. The book highlights accomplishments, embodies the finest memories, and captures the essence of the student body all in one hardcover book.

Speaking from experience, over the past 30 years, yearbooks have rapidly evolved due to the introduction of new technology. During my high school days, yearbooks were typed on typewriters, photos were developed in dark rooms, and pictures were cropped using croppers and grease pencils. Today, our yearbook is digitally created using the computer and the latest digital design program. The production of the 2017 yearbook marks the 10th anniversary of the Johnson County Central Public Schools, and our student staff has decided to capitalize on the anniversary by selecting the theme “Take Ten.” We are excited about the opportunity to produce the tenth edition of the JCC yearbook and are committed to making it the best book published in the history of JCC.

In order for us to reach our goal of creating an outstanding yearbook, we need your assistance. As a way to include all students in the yearbook, we are asking that both students and parents upload their favorite school event pictures to our website. If you’ve taken a picture that you would love to see in the yearbook, we would love to see it! Submitting a photo is easily done by clicking on the community upload link on the JCC website and entering the password “Tbirds”. Pictures can also be emailed to my email address.

Another way to help us achieve success with the 2017 yearbook is by BUYING a yearbook. Our Early Bird Sale will start in December, and this year, for your convenience, the books will be available not only at school for purchase, but also on-line through the school website. Your purchase helps ensure that our journalism program can continue at Johnson County Central.

So many great things are happening within our school, and my staff is working hard to capture every important moment of the school year. We look forward to seeing your reaction to our work and making future class reunions a success.

Inserted Image

Front: Ava Ascheman, Erin Hunzeker, Mary Sterup, Kris Farris (sponsor)
Back: Jayna Lambelet, Cassidy Parks, Sydnie Othmer, Michael Jamison, Michiel Jansen, Mark Splichal

Community Upload (Click Here)

 

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